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hip and proximal femur

A 24 year old woman with pain off and on for years

Case Identification
Case ID Number: 
20141212KK
Periosteal Reaction: 
absent
Benign/Malignant: 
Benign
Clinical case information
Case presentation: 

This woman has had pain in her left hip off and on for several years. The pain was much worse during the summer of 2014 but recently improved. Her current Xrays and CT show a partially healed recent pathological fracture through a large bone tumor in her left femur.

A 25 year old nanny with a right hip mass

Case Identification
Case ID Number: 
20120112NA
Benign/Malignant: 
unknown
Clinical case information
Case presentation: 

The patient is a healthy 25-year-old woman. She had a bump discovered near her right hip several years ago, that she thought was cellulite. It was not painful then. Recently the bump seems bigger, and it is now symptomatic.

Radiological findings:: 
There is a pedunculated surface lesion on the posterior aspect of the right proximal femur, which measures about 50 x 40 mm in size. It projects into the muscular tissues posterior and lateral to the lesser trochanter. Portions of the lesion are densely ossified. There are some ring and arc patterns of calcification. The lesion has a cap of tissue with high signal intensity on T2 weighted images consistent with cartilage. The maximum thickness of the cap is less than 2 cm.
Laboratory results:: 
none requested
Differential Diagnosis: 
Osteochondroma versus chondrosarcoma, secondary
Further Work Up Needed:: 
Due to the appearance and history of this lesion, combined with the thickness of the cartilage cap, excisional biopsy appears to be a reasonable approach.
Special Features of this Case:: 
When a lesion that has features consistent with osteochondroma has been growing or increasing in symptoms in an adult, secondary chondrosarcoma must be considered. However, the patient's history of a bump in the area several years ago helps establish that the lesion has probably been present for some time. Large deep osteochondromas around the proximal femur may be asymptomatic until some sort of bursitis or degenerative change begins causing inflammation or pain. Patients typically will present with these in their mid-20s or even in their 30s or 40s. The symptoms are not from growth of the lesion, but rather from the tissues that are in contact with the lesion becoming symptomatic due to advancing age.

A 30 year old breastfeeding mother with hip pain

Case Identification
Case ID Number: 
20150327BF
Periosteal Reaction: 
absent
Benign/Malignant: 
unknown
Clinical case information
Case presentation: 

A 30 year old woman who is recently postpartum has right hip pain.

Special Features of this Case:: 
this case is from Case Rep Radiol. 2014; 2014: 916935. Published online 2014 Jun 12. doi: 10.1155/2014/916935 PMCID: PMC4082918 Preetam Gongidi, 1 ,* Siva Jasti, 1 William Rafferty, 2 Veniamin Barshay, 1 and Richard Lackman 3

A 43 year old woman with breast cancer presents with severe hip pain and inability to walk

Case Identification
Case ID Number: 
20091117AA
Benign/Malignant: 
unknown
Clinical case information
Case presentation: 

A 43 year old woman with a history of breast cancer with bone metastasis presents with severe hip pain and inability to walk. Plain radiographs and a CT image of her right proximal femur are shown.

Radiological findings:: 
The patient has been active and her general condition is quite good. You have decided that the patient has the appropriate indications for operative intervention. What procedure do you choose?
Treatment Options:: 
The failure rate associated with fixation devices used to stabilize metastatic lesions of the proximal femur has been published . What is the liklihood of failure of a proximal femoral plate and compression screw device based on this report? What is the reported overall failure rate at 60 months for femoral fixation?
Special Features of this Case:: 
Here is a abstract of a publication that addresses this reconstructive challenge: Clin Orthop 1990 Feb;(251):213-9 Metastatic bone disease. A study of the surgical treatment of 166 pathologic humeral and femoral fractures. Yazawa Y, Frassica FJ, Chao EY, Pritchard DJ, Sim FH, Shives TC. Department of Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905. A retrospective study of the surgical treatment of 166 metastatic lesions of the humerus and femur in 147 patients was performed. There were 106 women and 41 men whose average age was 62 years. Two-thirds of the patients were treated for complete fractures, while one-third were treated for impending fractures. Breast, lung, and kidney carcinoma accounted for the majority of the primary lesions. One-half of the patients died within nine months of surgery, while one-quarter were alive 19.1 months after surgery. The patients with breast cancer had the best prognosis, while the patients with lung cancer had the worst. The probability of implant failure increased linearly with time to 33% at 60 months. The probability of failure for the femoral lesions was greater, with 44% at 60 months. The average survival in the patients with failed fixation in the femoral lesions was 34.5 months with a mean interval to failure at 17.7 months. The failure rate was high (23%) in proximal femoral lesions treated with a compression screw or nail plate. Common reasons for failure included poor initial fixation, improper implant selection, and progression of disease within the operative field. Bone cement augmentation should be used with the fixation device when possible. Complications due to hip-screw cut-out from the head may also be reduced by applying bone cement around the screw threads.
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